miércoles, 27 de octubre de 2010

Arte Paleolítico en Andalucía

Libro: Arte Paleolítico en Andalucía
Autor: Julián Martínez García
Editorial: Caja Granada
Nº Edición: 1ª
Año de edición: 2010
Plaza edición: CADIZ

Hace más de 30.000 años se dieron los primeros gestos \ artísticos\ de la humanidad en las paredes de numerosas cuevas. El arte rupestre de los cazadores recolectores del Paelolítico Superior se extendió y perduró a lo largo de 20.000 años y trazó un mapa, en la actual Europa, que hoy nos puede llevar desde la frontera natural con Asia, en los Montes Urales, hasta la frontera marítima con África, en las Sierras del Campo de Gibraltar. Sin lugar a dudas, un viaje apasionante por nuestra prehistoria, que nos llevará por tierras andaluzas.

The Story of Silbury Hill


Book: The Story of Silbury Hill
David Field (Author), Jim Leary (Author), Sir David Attenborough (Foreword)
Paperback: 160 pages
Publisher: English Heritage (December 31, 2010)

Product Description
Written by two experts with unrivalled information and knowledge of Silbury Hill, and combining scholarly research and readable narrative, this book sets out the archaeological story of Silbury: from an early recognition of its importance to antiquarian and archaeological investigations of the hill.

The book describes each event, setting it within its own historical and political context; the story of the monument is juxtaposed with the enigmatic and eccentric characters of the time. The collapse on the summit in 2000, leading to the opening of the hill's famous tunnel in 2007 to much media fanfare, is covered.

For the first time the results of the recent work are set out in detail, describing early activity on the site, the origins of the monument and the construction techniques used. Numerous new and vivid reconstruction drawings present a unique interpretation of this iconic prehistoric monument.

The book also describes how the monument was seen and used by later communities, from the Roman small town that grew up around the hill - the inhabitants quite literally living in its shadow - to medieval buildings on the summit. The final chapter discusses what Silbury means to people today: its power and spirituality for locals, visitors, New Agers and Druids alike.