miércoles, 13 de noviembre de 2013

When the Sahara Turned to Sand



The Sahara wasn’t always a desert. Trees and grasslands dominated the landscape from roughly 10,000 years ago to 5,000 years ago. Then, abruptly, the climate changed, and north Africa began to dry out.

Previous research has suggested that the end of the African Humid Period came gradually, over thousands of years, but a study published last month in Science says it took just a few hundred. The shift was initially triggered by more sunlight falling on Earth’s northern hemisphere, as Earth’s cyclic orientation toward the sun changed. But how that orbital change caused North Africa to dry out so fast–in 100 to 200 years, says the study–is a matter of debate.

Two feedback mechanisms have been proposed. In the first, as the climate gets warmer and drier, trees give way to sparser vegetation, making the now barren region warmer and drier, causing more vegetation to wither. The explanation favored by the authors–climate scientists Jessica Tierney, at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and Peter deMenocal, at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory–is that shifting sea-surface temperatures in the Indian Ocean reduced rainfall over east Africa. [...]  ldeo.columbia.edu

Related post

Unique Neanderthal camp found during car park dig in Den Bosch

The remains of a Neanderthal camp have been found during the building of an underground car park in Den Bosch, local broadcaster Omroep Brabant said on Wednesday.

The camp is dated from between 40,000 and 70,000 years ago and is unique in Dutch archeological history, archeologists says. The city council is holding a press conference this afternoon to explain more about the find.

The car park is being dug on the Hekellaan which is also the site of the old Den Bosch city walls, Omroep Brabant said. This summer city archeologists staged a small exhibition of finds from the dig. dutchnews.nl

Link 2: Video. Neanderthalerkamp ontdekt in Den Bosch



Actualización 14-11-13. Descubren campamento neandertal en ciudad holandesa de Den Bosch
Los restos de un campamento neandertal fueron descubiertos durante las obras de remodelación de un estacionamiento subterráneo en la ciudad holandesa de Den Bosch, se informó hoy.
Los restos de un campamento neandertal fueron descubiertos durante las obras de remodelación de un estacionamiento subterráneo en la ciudad holandesa de Den Bosch, se informó hoy.
El campamento aparentemente tiene una antigüedad de entre 40.000 y 70.000 años y es único en la historia de la arqueología de Holanda, comentaron los arqueólogos.
Los arqueólogos encontraron una amplia cantidad de herramientas de piedra y restos de huesos animales de renos, siervos gigantes, caballos y bisontes. Además, se halló la mandíbula inferior de un mamut joven.
El arqueólogo Ronald Genabeek declaró que el descubrimiento fue accidental. "No teníamos idea de que esta área estuviera habitada en ese período", dijo. El descubrimiento también incluye restos de osamentas y herramientas. "Todo está muy bien conservado, lo cual es excepcional en el oeste de Europa", expresó Genabeek. Fi. spanish.china.org.cn / Photos